Detailed Airbnb Listing Tips

lising tips

Pictures tell most of the story, but the listing description fills in the gaps and provides the details every guest needs.

Guests don’t want you to be vague, but they don’t want you to go on and on and on either.

Airbnb has made the listing even more guest-friendly by delivering all the information they need in a quick and organized fashion.

Ensure that your listing’s photos, property type, number of bedrooms, and general description accurately reflect the listing guests will experience.

Hosts MUST be truthful or else your guests will have unmet expectations…and that leads to….BAD REVIEWS!

We will detail the two main text portions of the listing and give you some considerations for each.

But first….you need to put on your Guest-Hat.  Think like a guest…what would YOU want to know if you are going to be traveling to somewhere you have never been before.

Ok, now let’s begin…

Part 1: Overview/About This Listing

Title

This is like a newspaper headline.  Use this to grab attention immediately.

What would grab your attention?

1 bedroom house in Anaheim

OR

Awesome home near Disneyland?

Use descriptive words that correspond to your unit such as loft or entire home.

Also, use words that describe why people would stay there such as romantic, kid-friendly or part house.

Max length is 35 characters so you have to make it count.

Pro Tip:  Keep testing.  Try out different titles and see if that increases your inquiries.  Also, try using your successful neighbors’ title.  Just note, it still has to be relevant and accurate to your listing.

Summary

Here is where you will write a short, yet powerful summary of your place.

Include the 2-3 major selling points of your place.

Think about your target audience and what’s important to them.  Is proximity to destinations, awesome amenities or a funny joke important to them?

250 Characters is the max length.

Guests gravitate to listings with personality so don’t be afraid to put some of yourself in it.

Part 2: Detailed Description

This is optional during the listing process, make sure you click this area below.
detailed description

The Space

Give guests the detailed description of your place and let them know what makes your unit unique.

Take time to describe the style, age, condition, noises, and smells one might encounter in your space.  What’s normal or subconscious to you might not be normal to guests.

Also, let guests know how many people it will fit.  Lastly, make sure they understand the little luxuries (in-house laundry, cool roommates) to tiny tribulations (slow internet, low water pressure).

Guest Access

This section is a bit tricky to some hosts.  We have seen some listings explain how guests get into the unit, but that’s NOT what this section is for.

In Guest Access, you should detail what your guests have access to.

Include examples of amenities, special areas of the property (pool, jacuzzi, garage) or unique admissions you can get them around the city.

Also, do not forget to let them know what is off limits, if anything.

Interaction with Guests

Every guest want to know that someone is able to help them if they have questions, just like a hotel.

In this section let them know how much you will interact with you guests during their stay.  Do you do daily calls or do you have them contact you if something happens?

Most importantly, let them know if you will you be present at the listing during their stay!  No guest wants to travel for a romantic weekend only to find out there will be a third (or even fourth wheel) in the house with them.

Lastly, list all of the ways they will be able to get ahold of you once they book (email, phone, walk to front house, you’re on the property, etc…)

The Neighborhood

Here is where you describe what it is like when you walk right out the door of your rental space.

Tell guests about the local coffee shop and what spots are “MUST SEE” places.  Remember to tell people how close destinations are.  We suggest using distance explanations that correlate to your guests mode of transportation.

Example: A  unit in a downtown area is probably best described  in “minutes walked” whereas a unit in a suburb may be best described in minutes driving.

Getting Around

Describe to your guest how they will navigate through the town.

Highlight public transit or even give them a few specific cab driver names.  One of the last hosts I stayed with in San Diego offered his bike to get around on – came in very, very handy.

Also, check out free Uber credits here.  Yes, some people have not used Uber yet…

Other Things to Note

Let your guests know if you often have pets in your space even if they won’t be home during your guests’ stay.

It’s important to inform those who may have allergies.

Lastly, let guests know about your roommates, any quirks of the place and fill in any gaps that you missed in any of the other sections.


House Rules

Let guests know what standards of conduct you expect from them.  Are there quiet hours?  Do you allow smoking or pets?

Read more on how to create Airbnb house rules.

Final thought: Last thing…put your personality into your description!

If it sounds boring or dull, then what image are you portraying about your place.  Show that you care to let prospective guests know EVERYTHING about their upcoming stay.

Make sure to use buzz words that your target audience would like to hear.

 

What are some listing tips you have?  Share them with us in the comments below.

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4 Comments

  1. Jacob Bjelfvenstam
    May 19, 2015
    • Steve Marcus
      August 28, 2017
  2. Scott Bendure
    May 24, 2016
  3. Prime Software
    September 20, 2017

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